photojournalism

The 64 Megapixel Blue Marble

NASA released this incredible new high-res image of the Earth, taken by the recently launched Earth-observing satellite, Suomi NPP.

The image, which centers on North and Central America, has been nicknamed “Blue Marble 2012″ after the famous “Blue Marble” image taken during the Apollo 17 mission in 1972. The original Blue Marble, featuring the Arabian Peninsula and Africa, is one of the most well recognized photographs of all time.

You can download the full image in fantastic 64 megapixel resolution (8,000 x 8,000)!

Moby gets (partially) electrocuted

Seems like Moby’s electric problems go the other way too. In 2008 I blogged about how his laser show fried my camera’s sensor (video), and now the tables turned when he was partially electrocuted at a performance in Amsterdam!

However I’m baffled by how (what looks like) a 12V DC light fixture could have caused him any harm. Methinks this a publicity stunt. But maybe Moby is a robot after all…

Youch… What would Eminem say about this?

Help BP learn how to use Photoshop

The two fateful images

As you might have heard in the news, BP further embarrassed themselves with some incompetently Photoshopped images which were released as real. Gizmodo and Americablog do a great job of tearing down these photos and showing just how bad the Photoshopping is.

Where do these edges come from?

And how did that get there?

Now Wired Science is taking it one step further with a competition for users to do take it to the next level – they’ll post some of the best, most interesting, funniest and most skilled images on their site. How good are your Photoshopping skills?

Volcanic beauty

I adore excellence in photography, and my breath was taken away by the amazing photographs taken of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano which is currently causing so much havoc in Iceland and Western Europe.

I have long observed that Iceland has a ridiculously high concentration of excellent photographers. This might have been because the (formerly) rich population of this small island nation had nothing else to do with all their krónur than drink and practice hobbies.

But that is only part of the story. With natural beauty such as this, who wouldn’t want to take up photography!?

Lightning and motion-blurred ash captured in a 15-second exposure. Taken at a distance 25 km from the Eyjafjallajokull craters on April 18th, 2010. (© Olivier Vandeginste)

The dangers of having a BIG camera

Over the recent days there was a lot of media coverage due to fresh video evidence on the tragic death of Namir Noor-Eldeen, an Iraqi photographer working for Reuters.

A contributing factor in his accidental killing was when the gunner in an American Apache helicopter mistook his camera for an RPG.

Zoom lens: mistaken for an RPG

Zoom lens: mistaken for an RPG

Of course this is an almost-absurd event. War photographers might often actually be protected by their large and obvious cameras, identifying them as presumably neutral observers.
But this serves a good introduction to the point I actually want to make – the “best” camera is often not the best camera to have. You might be encumbered by it, or even worse, might not have it with you at all.

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